WHAT IS A TRAFFIC GARDEN?

A traffic garden is a miniature town made up of small sized streets where children learn about roadwaysand safety. Depending on where they are found, they may be known as safety town, safety city, safety village, traffic park or one of the many other regional names. What traffic gardens all have in common is that they feature a network of streets that create a fun and safe environment for active learning. They provide a small scale world to ride bicycles, steer scooters and drive pedal cars. Children practice

bicycling and driving along roadways and through intersections and crossings, all in an environment free of motor vehicles.

WHY TRAFFIC GARDENS?

Children love and remember these miniature worlds where they can play independently or with their pals. More than that, traffic gardens can open children's eyes early to how the built world works so they can see the ways in which infrastructure can be made safer and more inclusive through design. Beyond the fun and learning, traffic gardens are a low-cost community resource and family-friendly gathering place for events, volunteering, and celebrations.

A SHORT HISTORY

Although traffic gardens did not gain widespread popularity in the United States until the 1970s, they have existed in various forms since the 1930's. A local police officer created the first U.S. Safety Town in Mansfield, Ohio in 1937 as an engaging safety education program for pre-kindergarten children. We have visited this hallowed spot and it is now a dingy parking area without even a marker to note its history.  Yet when Officer Frend Boals launched Safety Town, it was so popular that it received national coverage and inspired similar programs. The idea was not difficult to replicate and local champions emerged and established safety towns in surrounding communities and further afield. Many built permanent facilities using lots of local volunteer and business support.

 

Several decades later, there was a significant expansion of the idea with the establishment of National Safety Town by an Ohioan nursery school teacher, Mrs. Dorothy Chlad. With her organizing and publication of safety handbooks and manuals, the idea spread widely.  By 1964, there were about 20 U.S. programs and then by 1973, there were over 100. At the peak in the 1980's, 3,500 facilities existed worldwide. Unfortunately, the number of programs and facilities has since declined considerably and there has been little by way of central organizing, outside of the Safety Village movement. Hundreds of facilities of different types do remain in operation with many clustered geographically. To this day, the highest concentration of facilities anywhere in the world continues to be in their home state, Ohio.

TYPES OF TRAFFIC GARDENS

There is no one 'typical' traffic garden design style, but instead many variations of layouts and much local character evident in the features. What they all have in common is that they create a miniature network of streets that engages the imagination of children as they learn and have fun. In some cases, such as Safety Villages, they involve programming that is about much more than 'traffic safety' and they educate on such topics as fire prevention, household poisons, water safety and other important life lessons. For purposes of this website, we focus on the traffic-related elements of all the different styles of facilities and have organized them into the following typology:

TRAFFIC GARDEN PARK

TRAFFIC GARDEN COURT

TRAFFIC GARDEN KIT

SAFETY VILLAGES & CITIES

THEME PARK TRAFFIC GARDEN

TRAFFIC GARDEN BUILDING ELEMENT

FEATURE DETAILS

Traffic gardens range from lines painted on a parking lot to small-scale cities with electric cars, buildings, and operating traffic equipment. Much depends on facility size, funding, construction, available equipment, and target demographic. Because of the lack of standard design guidance, facilities often have some unique features and exhibit a lot of local character as well as reflect the specific work of the folks who championed them originally. Some sites have evolved over time, while some remain exactly as they were originally designed and built. Here are some common traffic garden features from existing traffic gardens:

SAFETY TOWN STORIES

Published circa 1930, this book was the inspiration for the original traffic garden!

PAVED STREETS

more

PAINTED STREETS

SIDEWALKS

INTERSECTIONS

BUILDINGS

SIGNS & SIGNALS

OTHER FEATURES

STORAGE

MOBILE EQUIPMENT

WHERE THEY ARE

Traffic gardens exist in countries all over the world but are found in particularly high concentrations in North America and Europe as well as parts of Africa and Asia. A handful have been in continuous operation since the 1970's and quite a few others have been operating successfully for 20 years or more. The United States is currently experiencing a resurgence with a number of new facilities installed in the last three years. We have identified 250 permanent traffic gardens around the world and hope to visit as many of them as we can over coming months and years to find out more. There has been little comprehensive information available about the unique design aspects, how they operate or the learning programming but we are on a mission to fix that. Click the map below to discover the thirty or so traffic gardens we've visited so far!

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© 2018 Fionnuala Quinn

CONTACT FIONNUALA:

Finn@TrafficGardens.com

or call 703.981.7052